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Archive for August, 2014

Senior Biking Sept 2014

The Sitka office of the Southeast Alaska Independent Living, Inc. (SAIL), will launch a new Senior Biking Club for those 60 or older with the first monthly ride set for 10 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 4. Meet at the SAIL office at 514 Lake St., and the ride will start from there.

The Senior Biking Club is modeled after SAIL’s Senior Hiking Club. The biking club costs $10 per person, and cyclists can use their own bikes or reserve one of SAIL’s bikes for the ride. SAIL has two-wheel and three-wheel bikes available, but you need to reserve them by Tuesday, Sept. 2.

To learn more about the Senior Biking Club, senior and adaptive kayaking trips, senior hiking events, and and a variety of other outdoors skills and survival classes, contact SAIL ORCA (Outdoor Recreation and Community Access) program coordinator Bridget Kratz at 747-6859 or email her at bkratz@sailinc.org. The calendar below includes hiking, orienteering, kayaking, and other events for seniors, youth, and the disabled.

• September 2014 calendar of events for SAIL programs

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A Sitka student clips the strap on his bike helmet after riding his bike to school during the International Walk (and Bike) to School event in October 2008. Now there is a new and separate National Bike to School Day, this year on Wednesday, May 9. (Daily Sitka Sentinel photo by James Poulson).

A Sitka student clips the strap on his bike helmet after riding his bike to school during the International Walk (and Bike) to School event in October 2008. Now there is a new and separate National Bike to School Day, this year on Wednesday, May 9. (Daily Sitka Sentinel photo by James Poulson).

(Note, the following item was posted on the Sitka Soup website on Aug. 22, 2014)

Description

On most roadways, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as other roadway users, but bicycles can be hard to see. The riders are exposed and easily injured in a collision. Oncoming bicycle traffic is often overlooked and its speed misjudged. Children riding bicycles create special problems for drivers because they are not capable of proper judgment in determining traffic conditions.

PLEASE:

  • When passing a bicyclist proceeding in the same direction, do so slowly and leave at least a distance between you and the bicycle of no less than 3 feet. Maintain this clearance until you have safely passed the bicycle.
  • The most common causes of collisions are drivers turning left in front of an oncoming bicycle or turning right, across the path of the bicycle. When your vehicle is turning left and there is a bicyclist entering the intersection from the opposite direction, you should wait for the bicyclist to pass before making the turn.
  • If your vehicle is turning right and a bicyclist is approaching on the right, let the bicyclist go through the intersection first before making a right turn. Remember to always use your turn signals.
  • Watch for bicycle riders turning in front of you without looking or signaling, especially if the rider is a child.
  • Take extra precautions in school zones and neighborhood areas where children and teenagers might be riding. Watch out for bikes coming out of driveways or from behind parked cars or other obstructions.
  • Check side mirrors for bicyclists before opening the door. Some communities may fine drivers for collisions caused by opening a vehicle door in the path of a bicyclist.

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